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November roundup: What does it take to bring technology to market?

By Alexandra Reid

This month saw a lot of action in the Canadian startup scene and we covered much of it here on our blog. Most notably, Startup Canada launched its much anticipated Startup Blueprints, an ambitious web platform that summarizes what the organisation heard this past summer, and sets out what needs to be done to turn those ideas and reflections into concrete action.

But that shouldn’t eclipse the wonderful work of Maple Leaf Angels and CanWit, two organisations that have fostered a partnership to create new investment opportunities for women-led startups in Canada. The National Angel Capital Organization also held its annual conference in Halifax, where important debates took place about the value of crowdfunding and how investment in this country could be improved.

Of course, those stories don’t even scratch the surface of our coverage this month. In case you missed any, here’s a handy roundup of our posts, ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers.

November 19: Lessons for entrepreneurs who wish to globalize their startups upon inception: Part 2 by Tony Bailetti

November 28: If Jack and Jill had worked together to engineer a well water system … by Leo Valiquette

November 20: Celebrating 25 years of community support by Alexandra Reid

November 29: A clarion call to make Canada an entrepreneurial economy by Francis Moran

November 6: CMI-MarketingProfs report reveals B2B content marketing confusion by Alexandra Reid

November 12: The CMO is dead by Dominique Turpin

November 27: Product management: Give the user the best possible mobile experience by Peter Hanschke

November 13: Hey, kid, I hear you want to be an entrepreneur by Leo Valiquette

November 26: Supporting investment in women-led startups by Alexandra Reid

November 7: Give capitalists the ball, let them run by Leo Valiquette

November 14: Lessons for entrepreneurs who wish to globalize their startups upon inception by Tony Bailetti

November 5: The neuroscience behind elections by Bob Bailly

November 8: Hootsuite CEO Ryan Holmes inspires hometown crowd: Video by Fiona Campbell

November 14: The subsistence diet of government — and some VC — funding by Francis Moran

November 21: Walking the digital tightrope: The perils of co-branded employees by Megan Totka

November 22:  Startup Canada to call for urgent action to support Canadian entrepreneurs by Francis Moran

November 1: Even angels are going enterprise by Francis Moran

November 16: How to create brighter lives with content marketing by Alexandra Reid

Image: Oana Befort

The subsistence diet of government — and some VC — funding

By Francis Moran

Former Canadian Olympic gold medalist and chef de mission Mark Tewksbury gave a keynote address at the National Angel Capital Organization‘s summit in Halifax in late October. In urging that Canadian business adopt the Olympic movement’s Own the Podium approach that sees athlete funding going disproportionately to those who show the best promise of winning a medal, Tewksbury said we have to move away from the old Canadian funding model. That approach, he said, sees government spread its limited funds across too many recipients, ensuring that nobody starves but also that nobody gets the resources they really need to succeed. As Tewksbury put it, funding before Own the Podium was “one for me, one for you,” ensuring “one for me-diocrity.”

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October roundup: What does it take to bring technology to market?

By Alexandra Reid

As usual, we covered a lot of ground on our blog last month.

We explored why startups should focus on problems, not platforms, and why they shouldn’t outsource their core competencies. Francis explained why marketing involves much more than just creating a message and delivering that message with the tools of advertising and public relations. Mitch Joel supported that argument by stating that marketing is everything. Leo shared lots of great media relations advice, teaching us how to pitch to busy journalists without becoming a nuisance. Of course, these just scratch the surface of the topics we covered.

In case you missed any, here is a handy roundup of our posts last month, ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

October 16: Meet ..duo by Alexandra Reid

October 11: Montreal’s Notman House enters final funding stage by Francis Moran

October 10: Mitch Joel on why marketing is everything by Alexandra Reid

October 15: Social media gaffes: They can happen to anyone by Megan Totka

October 22: The plight of product managing myself by Peter Hanschke

October 24: ‘Put away the cozy image of the little old lady knitting a sweater for the grandkids’ by Alexandra Reid

October 9: Apple versus Samsung – Every patent owner’s dream by David French

October 2: Why I started learning code: a marketer’s perspective by Alexandra Reid

October 4: Marketing is about more than the colour of your new website by Francis Moran

October 23: Pitching to busy media figures in various media environments by Leo Valiquette

October 17: The thin line between being persistent and being a nuisance by Leo Valiquette

October 30: Make sure you’re barking up the right tree by Leo Valiquette

October 18: Canadian angel investors to gather in Halifax next week by Francis Moran

October 31: Pitch perfect: Startups should focus on problems, not platforms by Alexandra Reid

October 25: Communications planning: The principles by Caroline Kealey

October 3: Startups: Do not outsource your core competency by Leo Valiquette

October 29: The allure of building enterprise products by Jesse Rodgers

Image: 10Wallpaper.com

Even angels are going enterprise

By Francis Moran

There’s been a growing amount of attention paid recently to the surge in interest by startups in working on enterprise-grade products and services rather than the quick-to-market consumer and web applications that for so long seemed to dominate pitch contests, accelerator program cohorts and media attention.

Enterprise is getting sexy,” Kevin Rose of Google Ventures said recently. Bernard Lunn has done a 180 on his 10-year-old requiem for enterprise software, saying it didn’t die, it just went into a coma from which it is now recovering. Enterprises, Lunn said, “cannot simply empower every employee with consumer web type tools and hope they all pull together to grow the profits.” Our own Jesse Rodgers wrote earlier this week about the allure of building enterprise products, saying that opportunities in the enterprise are being driven by the BYOD movement that is requiring IT departments to deliver better tools, a higher expectation of a better user experience than that delivered by stodgy old enterprise software, and an easing of the once-onerous burden associated with the enterprise sale.

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Canadian angel investors to gather in Halifax next week

By Francis Moran

The National Angel Capital Organization’s Angel Summit, an annual gathering of those critical early-stage backers of new ventures, will wing its way to my former home town of Halifax, Nova Scotia, next week for three days of professional development workshops, company pitches and networking. As has been the case for the past few years, I will be there to report on the latest news and trends out of this important investment community.

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Recent Comments

  • Bob Bailly : Your new mode of working means no face to face interaction yet you call yourself empathetic. How can removing yourself from daily human social interactions and possibly understand what makes other people tick. Research from UCLA suggests messages conveyed face to face are understood primarily by reading body language (57%) and tone of voice (35%), and that words convey only 7%. By interacting only through computer based non-video technology is like weightlifting only using your right forearm.

  • Anna : As a freelancer who spends much of her time on the computer writing, I find that I have a brain which connects empathically to people despite how much time I spend on technology. In fact, I am not happy being immersed daily in what I called 'imposed' social interaction (social interaction brought on by having to interact with co-workers). Such social interaction used to make be egregious, used to make me dislike co-workers, and have a generally negative view on work life. Furthermore, people like me who are generally empathic can 'hide' in our homes and be safe from others while we work; safe from their criticisms and aversions, safe from bullying and harassment. Furthermore, our talents as writers, photographers, or whatever, flourish absolutely under one important condition - freedom. I support moving work to an online domain because I see also how harmful the 9 - 5 is for people; how it drains them, how its endless cacophony of alarm clocks and ringing bells--lunch hours and lunch rooms, forced staff retreats and uncomfortable interactions with bosses--is killing them. I support allowing technology make us more efficient, happier. I support voluntary--not forced--interaction. I support eliminating the workplace altogether and creating NEW modes of working, either from home or through community-based platforms such as outdoor spaces.

  • 5 Ways to Engage With Your Brand Voice - icuc.social : [...] “A strong company voice on social media should emphasize the company’s values, objectives and key differentiators that set it apart from its competitors. These can be expressed in the tone of the communication and the content that is shared with community members and the target audience.The best social media voices are communal, grammatical, dialectical, authentic, original, contextual, relevant, timely, persistent, responsive, helpful, generous and more informal. A company’s social media voice should only be changed if absolutely necessary and should maintain all of these qualities. Any change should be preceded by lots of information explaining the change to community members to ensure they know it is deliberate and that the company isn’t suffering from some form of instability, which jeopardizes relationships.” [@TechAlly, Francis Moran & Associates – via Francis Moran & Associates] [...]

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