We Bring Technology to Market.

Work with us

Peeling away the layers of a great CEO

By Denzil Doyle

In my last article, I discussed the tendency of key stakeholders in a high technology company to call for the CEO’s resignation at the first sign of trouble, particularly if the CEO is a technical person who lacks “business management” experience. The pressure for change is usually strongest from the financial community. My advice to a board of directors that must deal with such pressure is to remain focused on the qualities that any good CEO must possess regardless of his or her background, namely leadership, management, technology knowhow, and marketing knowhow.

I cited the example of Ken Olsen, the founding president of Digital Equipment Corporation, who came under severe criticism from Wall Street for turning in a bad quarter shortly after the company went public, despite the fact that he had built a company with sales of over $100 million in less than a decade. (That was the equivalent of over $1 billion today.)

Ken decided to go to New York and address his critics directly. He started with a lecture that went something like this:

Read More

April Roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

By Leo Valiquette

Last month’s lineup featured great posts on how established companies should innovate, a startup CEO’s tips for wooing investors, the risks of discounting your product and the need for philanthropy to be a natural part of doing business. And of course, there was plenty of sage advice on what it takes to make marketing work.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

April 18: In search of that Entrepreneurial Spark, by Maurice Smith

April 23: What have you done for someone else lately?, by Leo Valiquette

April 11: Want more business from your website? Here are 6 things your customers need to see, by Tim Peter

April 24: A startup CEO’s tips for wooing investors, by John Hill and Leo Valiquette

April 25: The folly (or possibly the wisdom) of discounting, by Francis Moran

April 10: Best of: The saddest marketing story I’ve ever heard, by Francis Moran

April 17: My top travel tips, by Francis Moran

April 8: When is it time to say, ‘Our CEO’s got to go?’by Denzil Doyle

April 16: The imperatives of leaders, leadership and leading, by Bob Bailly

April 29: In it until everyone crosses the finish line, by Leo Valiquette

April 15: What an entrepreneur can learn from a literary conference: Part III, by Leo Valiquette

April 4: Trademark hygiene: A cautionary tale, by David French

April 30:Patent harvesting versus mandated innovation, by David French

April 3: ‘You can’t cross a canyon in two leaps’, by Francis Moran

April 2: Best of: Just the facts … no, these facts, by Leo Valiquette

April 9: What an entrepreneur can learn from a literary conference: Part II, by Leo Valiquette

Image: April 2013 Calendar Printable

 

The imperatives of leaders, leadership and leading

By Bob Bailly

“Men make history, and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.”

Harry S Truman, 33rd president of United States (1884 – 1972)

Over the last several months Canadians have watched the eldest son of Pierre Trudeau move from the fringes of the Liberal Party to become its newly elected leader. After he garnered 80 per cent of the first ballot votes at the party convention last weekend, Justin Trudeau has finally been able to overcome the disdain of his opponents and the media. But as journalist Michael Den Tandt observes, “the latter will not last – unless Trudeau proves to be as effective a leader as he is a campaigner.”

But what constitutes an effective leader?

Read More

Walking the digital tightrope: The perils of co-branded employees

By Megan Totka

Before businesses began to really cash in on the power of social media, people were signing up for Twitter, Facebook and MySpace accounts in the privacy of their homes. These platforms allowed a new medium for self-expression, along with networking opportunities. Businesses began to see the advantages of connecting with their customers and started using social media, too.  Just over five years into the social media boom, it is not uncommon to see individual accounts with hundreds, or even thousands, of followers or friends. While there is nothing wrong with being popular in online circles, an unexpected consequence has arisen for businesses: co-branded employees.

Read More

10 questions B2B companies should ask before selecting a content marketing service provider

By Alexandra Reid

It’s all over the headlines: B2B businesses are investigating and investing in content marketing en masse.

In fact, B2B marketers are employing an average of eight different content marketing tactics to achieve their goals and are spending more than a quarter of their budgets on content marketing. As a content marketer myself, I understand the appeal and regard it as a superb marketing option for authority-based businesses and for any company for which establishing thought leadership is a critical marketing objective.

But, as I have argued before with regards to social media marketing, marketers have a way of putting the pressure on businesses to adopt (supposedly) new practices. Content marketing done right can be expensive and it isn’t for everyone. Businesses must take a step back, do their research and ask the right questions before diving in headfirst. This is especially important for content marketing because its success rests entirely on the quality of the content produced and how it is shared with the target audience.

If you’re a B2B business seeking content marketing services, here are some questions you should ask, after doing your own research, to ensure you select the right people for the job:

Read More

Recent Comments

  • Final Fling in the news and media : [...] 10: Canadian marketing experts blog on Fling taking on the ultimate marketing [...]

  • The best of the web | How to Be Creative (and Why it’s Necessary) : [...] Moran recently likened the current state of content marketing to the early state of radio. Anyone with access to the tools could claim expertise in radio, but as it evolved, it was apparent [...]

  • Francis Moran : Glad you liked the piece, Paul. I don't think you've ever been a client, so you are not directly referenced in any of my examples. But these shortcomings are common afflictions among marketing companies, so the shoe probably fits. :) As for your question about the Ottawa tech community being more marketing savvy? Yes, I believe it is.

Join us

Events We're Attending:

  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description