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March roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

By Leo Valiquette

March break aside, we kept up the pace last month with a great lineup of content that featured some excellent posts from our guest bloggers. Hot topics included opportunities in the global smart TV market, criteria for hiring a worthy writer and the risks and rewards of having a product that is truly unique in the marketplace.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

March 20: Calling Canada’s startups: There’s a $200B TV market ripe for the taking, by Jason Flick

March 19: Is that writer worth the cost of the ink?, by Leo Valiquette

March 26: The ballad of the undifferentiated product, by Francis Moran

March 27: The ‘Accelerator Bubble’ will pop, but not for the reason you think it will, by Jesse Rodgers

March 25: Three (not so) simple strategies to avoid ‘losing the plot’ in marketing, by Rob Woyzbun

March 07: Oracles, shamans and storytellers, by Bob Bailly

March 13: It’s still rock and roll to me, by Francis Moran

March 21: Best of: My three buckets of customer segmentation, by Francis Moran

March 06: You can’t rely on the channel to grow sales in new markets, by Jeff Campbell

March 11: Drafting your own patent disclosure document, by David French

March 12: Don’t give your customers reasons to ask for apologies, by Leo Valiquette

March 18: Some dos and don’ts of governance, by Denzil Doyle

March 14: Before you jump on the content-marketing bandwagon …, by Leo Valiquette

March 05: From courting Hollywood’s A-list to navigating the Chinese New Year, by Leo Valiquette and John Hill

Image: March2013CalendarPrintable.com

 

February roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

By Leo Valiquette

It may have been a short month, by we still pulled together in February a rich lineup of content for marketers, entrepreneurs and investors alike. Hot topics included how not to do customer service, what’s to love and hate about technology marketing, the root causes of the so-called Series A crunch and the risks of “mentor whiplash.”

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

Feb. 5: Is the ‘last mile’ of sales automation keeping your reps from closing more business?, by Jeff Campbell

Feb. 7: The trouble with mentors is…, by Francis Moran

Feb. 21: 6 little things that tell your customers you don’t care, by Linda Moran and Francis Moran

Feb. 25: Ego capital and the ‘Series A Crunch’, by Ronald Weissman

Feb. 13: Getting to the point in drafting a patent application, by David French

Feb. 20: The traditional corporate presentation is dead!, by Anil Dilawri

Feb. 27: You just never know where a story is going to stick, by Leo Valiquette

Feb. 6: Does your business suffer from multiple personalities?, by Leo Valiquette

Feb. 11: Do you have the key ingredients for an effective board?, by Denzil Doyle

Feb. 26: App development today demands a three-in-one approach, by Peter Hanschke

Feb. 14: Why I heart tech marketing, by Francis Moran

Feb. 28: Why I hate tech marketing, by Francis Moran

Feb. 19: Do your PR people suffer from telephobia?, by Leo Valiquette

Image: February2013CalendarPrintable.com

Tales from the trenches: New associate joins our team

Introducing Jeff Campbell

Jeff just can’t seem to get enough of us. He’s twice been a client. He’s long been one of our go-to guys whenever we needed a solid reference. And now, he likes our company so much he’s decided to join as an associate. And we’re delighted to have him.

Jeff is a serial CEO and entrepreneur with a lengthy record of achievement in securing investment, building international sales and business-development channels, and accelerating the commercialization of new technology. With more than 30 years spent in companies both large and small – from the Microsofts and EDS Systemhouses of the world to fast-growth startups like AssetMetrix and PerspecSys – Jeff has a thoroughly rounded perspective on exactly what it takes to bring technology to market.

Jeff will be making regular contributions to our blog, starting with today’s post, below. He will be writing about how to build effective sales and business-development capacity to drive revenue, as well as how to position for investment, strategic partnerships and acquisition. And he represents us in the Waterloo region that he calls home and is a valued team member addressing the sales and channel-development requirements of our strategy clients.

By Jeff Campbell

It is at once intimidating and encouraging to be invited to blog with Francis Moran and Associates. Intimidating because I hold Francis and the folks who work with him in such high esteem, particularly as writers, editors and communicators. Me? I write like I talk. That means a blatant disregard for grammar, structure and spellin’, and a propensity to over use superlative adjectives and adverbs. It is encouraging for this reason (high-quality editing) and because of the collaboration that will ensue. Francis and the band of associates are a team of accomplished individuals with whom I very much look forward to sharing ideas, experiences and learnings in the coming months.Why am I blogging here? What interesting things can I share? Well, with more than 30 years of experience, I have a lot of stories. There are stories just screaming to get told, stories that result from selling a company to Microsoft, stories about commercializing innovative products, stories about building a business with a business model very few people understood at the time, stories about fundraising and stories about building channels and the relationships that make them effective.

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30 considerations for getting tech to market: Part II

This is the 31st article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

Last week, we began a three-part recap of our Commercialization Ecosystem series with insights and practical advice on securing investment capital and finding champions to help get your technology to market. We continue this week with commercialization out of the university setting, the value of mentor capital and building your startup’s DNA.

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Is that person in the mirror standing between you and success?

This is the seventh article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

“Nothing disheartens me more than meeting an entrepreneur in B.C. who says his ambition is to one day conquer the Ontario market,” Anthony Lee, general partner at Altos Ventures and co-founder of the C100, told us in an interview a few months back.

While building a globally competitive company may not be the right objective for everyone, Lee makes a key point. For any venture to succeed, its founders must have a vision that will stretch the boundaries of what they know and challenge what they believe is attainable.

Read More

Recent Comments

  • Francis Moran : I'm so glad to see you warming to this idea, Luc. Not that you were ever one of those mindless critics who automatically opposed the proposal; you were properly skeptical and demanding that it contain more of what folks like you and I believed was necessary for success. Looks like the city is listening.

  • Luc Lalande : Hi Francis, thank you for the steady and keen eye on the development of this important project for the City. I share your view that open spaces in the building’s design will be critical components for encouraging spontaneous interactions between people. Integrating such spaces in the Innovation Complex sends the right signals to the community-at-large and not just the local startup ecosystem: everyone is welcomed! With respect to Patti’s comments about the arts sector, it would be worth bringing back to light that the Hintonburg-Mechanicsville area has emerged as the first Arts District in the City of Ottawa, housing many artist studios, performing arts studios, and media groups. While the 7 Bayview located Innovation Complex may cater to the entrepreneurial set, there is still considerable property on these lands that could, one day, be developed and capitalize on the area’s sizable artistic community. But perhaps the open spaces at the Innovation Complex can be equally accommodating for anyone who embraces creativity and entrepreneurship: artists and innovators alike.

  • How can we foster culture of entrepreneurship? | Waterloo Innovation Summit : [...] Velocity also provides hands-on workshops for anyone at the University to learn about becoming a successful entrepreneur, and awards over $300,000 per year through the Velocity Fund to promising early startups, to help launch their success financially. We keep finding really good problems that are worthy of solving and that we think we’d be good at solving. - Mike Kirkup, Director of Velocity and Student Innovation Waterloo’s Velocity accelerator is 5, and growing fast [...]

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