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30 considerations for getting tech to market: Part III

This is the 32nd article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

While there will no doubt be the occasional post that will still fall into the Commercialization Ecosystem category, today marks the official end of this series with which we launched our new blog back in February. Next week, we will introduce several new series, but first, let’s conclude our three-part recap of what we have learned about getting technology to market.

Two weeks ago, we began with insights and practical advice on securing investment capital and finding champions to help get your technology to market. Last week, we continued with commercializing university IP, the value of mentor capital and what it means to be lean. Today we conclude with the strategic role marketing must play from day one of a startup, engaging with your community and what role government should play.

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30 considerations for getting tech to market: Part I

This is the 30th article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

Six months ago we launched this “12-part” series to put forth ideas, yield practical insights and provoke thoughtful discussion about what it takes to get technology to market. Thanks in no small part to the enthusiastic response of our readers, we let the series evolve and grow as it would.

More than 50 posts later, including 30 we wrote plus another score of contributed articles, it is reasonable to say that we have cast at least a passing spotlight on just about every issue pertinent to such a broad subject. Dozens of individuals have shared their time and expertise with us as interviewees, subject matter experts and guest bloggers, and we thank them all.

But all good things must come to an end. While there will no doubt be the occasional post that will still bear the header, The Commercialization Ecosystem, we will be moving on to new series in a few weeks. But first, what have we learned about what it takes to get technology to market? In a three-part wrap-up, we will recap what we have learned that every entrepreneur and tech executive needs to know.

We begin today with that watershed moment.

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Words of wisdom: Another look in the mirror

This is the 10th article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

As we have said before, entrepreneurs must have a vision that will stretch the boundaries of what they know and challenge what they believe is attainable. They must be willing to seek the outside counsel and feedback that will reveal the weaknesses in themselves, their teams, their technology and their paths to market. It’s difficult to overcome a weakness if you haven’t recognized and acknowledged it.

We conclude our Words of Wisdom string today by looking once again at the human factor and the right stuff that individual entrepreneurs and management teams need to succeed. There is no denying that the greatness of an organization is defined by its people. But how do you ensure that you are making the right hires?

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Is that person in the mirror standing between you and success?

This is the seventh article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

“Nothing disheartens me more than meeting an entrepreneur in B.C. who says his ambition is to one day conquer the Ontario market,” Anthony Lee, general partner at Altos Ventures and co-founder of the C100, told us in an interview a few months back.

While building a globally competitive company may not be the right objective for everyone, Lee makes a key point. For any venture to succeed, its founders must have a vision that will stretch the boundaries of what they know and challenge what they believe is attainable.

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Silicon Valley: A big bright heat lamp for startup incubation

This is the fifth article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

In his book, The Way Ahead: Meeting Canada’s Productivity Challenge, Tom Brzustowski, RBC professor for the commercialization of innovation at the University of Ottawa’s Telfer School of Management, talks about the “social contract between science and society in the U.S.” that arose in the late 1940s and gave rise to that unique ecosystem we know today as Silicon Valley.

The basis of this contract is found in Science: The Endless Frontier, a 1945 report to U.S. President Harry Truman by visionary Vannevar Bush that outlined a U.S. post-war science and technology policy that would ultimately result in the creation of the National Science Foundation. In the years that followed, military-funded unclassified R&D in the private sector, driven by the pressures of the Cold War and the space race, laid the foundation for Silicon Valley and made Bush’s vision a reality.

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