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Great articles roundup: The series A crunch, pitching well, email and content marketing, scaring investors

By Leo Valiquette

As a regular feature, we provide our readers with a roundup of some of the best articles we have read in the past week. On the podium this week are TechCrunch, Polaris Venture Partners, Pando Daily, Gust and MarketingSherpa.

Median angel deal size rises as startups look for more runway amid a series A bottleneck

TechCrunch’s Kim-Mai Cutler writes about how the median size of angel deals rose to $640,000 in the third quarter of last year – a five-quarter high – as startups looked for more runway amid a bottleneck for Series A rounds. Silicon Valley Bank partnered with data company CB Insights and the Angel Resource Institute to survey different angel groups about activity in the fall of last year.

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December roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

By Leo Valiquette

Though we took our usual holiday break in December, we still covered a lot of ground on the blog during the month. Scotland’s startup scene, the unintended consequences of Canada’s Scientific Research and Experimental Development tax credit program, and practical pointers for handing off a content marketing program were among the many topics we covered.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

Dec. 5: It’s that time again to put life and work in perspective, by Leo Valiquette

Dec. 12: Don’t spit your PR effort into the wind, by Leo Valiquette

Dec. 6: SR&ED and the law of unintended consequences, by Francis Moran

Dec. 20: Is this my very last blog post?, by Francis Moran

Dec. 3: Lessons from Project Glass: Why embracing technology is not optional, by Megan Totka

Dec. 17: Commercializing research in Scotland, by Maurice Smith

Dec. 4: Top 10 questions every strategic communicator should ask, by Caroline Kealey

Dec. 10: Apple versus Samsung: Samsung’s ‘out’ to escape infringement, by David French

Dec. 11: A timely post about succession planning in content marketing, by Alexandra Reid

Dec. 13: Content is the sun around which all else revolves, by Francis Moran

Dec. 19: Businesses must think like publishers, says C.C. Chapman, by Alexandra Reid

Dec. 18: Data mining, DNA or otherwise, no substitute for real customer dialogue, by Leo Valiquette

First-time entrepreneurs: There are big ideas, and then there are doable ideas

This is the second article in a continuing series chronicling the growth path of ..duo, a startup based out of Kelowna B.C. that creates simple keywords that use your name, brand, slogan or any other word combination as a shortcut to content on the web.

By Alexandra Reid

Daylin Mantyka, cofounder of ..duo, is reconsidering her entrepreneurial path and the future of her startup following counsel from a mentor who said her idea might be too “big.”

To advise a first-time startup founder to avoid shooting for the stars is like telling a child Santa Clause doesn’t exist. It’s the kind of stuff that crushes dreams. But there might be some merit in talking first-time startup founders down from the clouds and encouraging them to focus on smaller ideas that can be more easily realized.

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Great articles roundup: entrepreneurship, crowdfunding, investment, marketing, and growth

By Alexandra Reid

As a regular feature, we provide our readers with a roundup of some of the best articles we have read in the past week. On the podium this week are The Kernel, Both Sides of the Table, Venture Village, Business Insider and Financial Post.

Some entrepreneurs are more equal than others

Social decadence and a poisonous educational culture in the West is fooling a generation of young people into thinking they can pen runaway entrepreneurial success stories. But they can’t, writes Milo Yiannopoulos.

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Commercializing research in Scotland

By Maurice Smith

It has been nearly 20 years since Scottish Enterprise, then a fairly new economic agency, launched an inquiry into Scotland’s comparatively low business birth rate.

In 1993 the talk was all about improving access to finance, encouraging university spin-outs and challenging a culture that was seen to be risk averse and over dependent on jobs from big employers, public and private.

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Recent Comments

  • James LaPalme : Francis Would not say thrived - but close - in spite of geography. 15ish years ago - a group of similar skilled and experience and capable business folks (sales, channel, alliance, business development) all lived in Canada (Ottawa-Toronto-Waterloo). All except for one stayed - that would be me. Well the guys that went to Silicon Valley have thrived well beyond expectations. The others - Boston, Dallas and EU have done very well - thrived. My survival has been predominately based on CEO's from outside Ontario seeing my value. Best to move on to more receptive fertile ground if ambitious. A successful strategy is to move south do a few years and remove the pure northern business experience then come back - which my experience is very few will.

  • Francis Moran : I'm so glad to see you warming to this idea, Luc. Not that you were ever one of those mindless critics who automatically opposed the proposal; you were properly skeptical and demanding that it contain more of what folks like you and I believed was necessary for success. Looks like the city is listening.

  • Luc Lalande : Hi Francis, thank you for the steady and keen eye on the development of this important project for the City. I share your view that open spaces in the building’s design will be critical components for encouraging spontaneous interactions between people. Integrating such spaces in the Innovation Complex sends the right signals to the community-at-large and not just the local startup ecosystem: everyone is welcomed! With respect to Patti’s comments about the arts sector, it would be worth bringing back to light that the Hintonburg-Mechanicsville area has emerged as the first Arts District in the City of Ottawa, housing many artist studios, performing arts studios, and media groups. While the 7 Bayview located Innovation Complex may cater to the entrepreneurial set, there is still considerable property on these lands that could, one day, be developed and capitalize on the area’s sizable artistic community. But perhaps the open spaces at the Innovation Complex can be equally accommodating for anyone who embraces creativity and entrepreneurship: artists and innovators alike.

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