We Bring Technology to Market.

Work with us

For the last time, they won’t come just because you’ve built it

This is the 11th article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

“Companies that can’t clearly articulate their customer and market are not real serious companies, they are research projects … Engineering and marketing need to work together from the get go.”

We began this series a couple of months ago with this timeless quote from Band of Angels’ Ronald Weissman. It strikes to the heart of what all of us here take as gospel.

Read More

Words of wisdom: What can you learn from a thunder lizard?

This is the eighth article in a continuing series that examines the state of the ecosystem necessary to successfully bring technology to market. Based on dozens of interviews with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors, business leaders, academics, tech-transfer experts and policy makers, this series looks at what is working and what can be improved in the go-to-market ecosystem in the United States, Canada and Britain. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

“A startup is ultimately … not just about whether an idea or a product works, it is about whether or not you can create a business around it. Whether or not the ecosystem will support it, the customers will buy it, if the channels will support it, and if the manufacturers will actually create it. And because of that, we need to be able to test all these different facets of our business model, and do so quickly.”

This comes from someone Forbes calls “the most powerful woman in startups,” Ann Miura-Ko, co-founding partner with FLOODGATE. In October, she gave a lecture at Stanford University titled “Funding Thunder Lizard Entrepreneurs,” which is filled with so much insight we were tempted to just transcribe the whole damned thing and offer it up as a blog post of its own. However, her talk is available as a conveniently indexed webcast.

Read More

Recent Comments

  • Francis Moran : Hi, Jo. Thanks for the comment. I had hoped to attend the conference but it was sold out. Maybe next year. Not sure if your collaboration comment was directed at me or CCDI. If me, please drop me an email at francis@francis-moran.com and tell me more about what you have in mind.

  • Jo Head : I share your disappointment with the Expo - it was barely reflective of the ambition of the organisers and not at all reflective of the excitement, passion and creativity that I have come to love. I thought I was going to the Expo and booked the conference in error - the biggest & best mistake I have ever made. I feel inspired to see how I can help to deliver the Expo objective and to open the gateway. I enquired as to the export process through the CCDI ( Cape Craft and Design Institute ) whose role it is to promote export - they asked me what I meant by process. Their database (when you can access it) is even more disappointing than the Expo. Is there an opportunity to collaborate?

  • Is your leader a “Rob Ford”? | : [...] – See more at: http://francis-moran.com/startups/is-your-founder-a-rob-ford/#sthash.bX2ARK8k.dpuf [...]

Join us

Events We're Attending:

  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description