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It’s amazing how fast a tight, all-hands meeting can clear the air

By Leo Valiquettemeetings

I don’t have an MBA and I haven’t partaken of any executive leadership programs. Whatever insights I offer on this blog about group dynamics and management arise from what you might call qualitative participant observation.

In other words, I take note of what helps, and what hinders, when it comes to getting __________ done by a given deadline, to whatever standard or benchmarks meet with the general approval of the stakeholders involved.

What do I consider to be one of the most important tools for getting _________ done?

The all-hands meeting.

Yes, I can hear the groans out there. There is no shortage of literature that talks about how meetings kill productivity, in hand with ample advice on how to make meetings more organized and productive.

What I want to focus on here is the value of having a meeting in the first place.

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October roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

By Daylin MantykaCalendar-October-2013-Excel

Last month’s contents were newsworthy and informative. Leading the pack was Maurice Smith’s post on the ultimate marketing challenge followed by Leo Valiquette’s piece on phone etiquette. As always, we had some great contributions from our guest bloggers on presentation skills, measuring Facebook contest ROI, the neurobiology of marketing, and filing patent applications, among others.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

October 9: The ultimate marketing challenge: Final Fling helps plan your own death, by Maurice Smith

October 29: Don’t let your phone skills atrophy, by Leo Valiquette

October 23: When a good presentation isn’t good enough, by Anil Dilawri

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Great articles roundup: Content briefs, entrepreneurship, behavioural economics and social media

By Daylin Mantyka link

It’s Friday — which means that it’s time for the weekly roundup. This week. we have informative content from velocity, Founder Dating, memeburn, The Buzz Bin and Duct Tape Marketing.

7 critical elements of a great content brief 

Doug Kessler says that home-run content doesn’t happen by accident and that it always starts with a great plan. Since marketers aren’t often the ones producing the content, it’s incredibly important to communicate clearly in content briefs. Besides the usual stuff nascent to all, Doug goes a step further and identifies seven elements to turn good into great.

Am I an entrepreneur?

A serial entrepreneur based out of Silicon Valley, Rick Marini hears from many young startup enthusiasts and how they want to build a multibillion-dollar company. But before jumping in, he urges you to consider whether or not you actually are an entrepreneur or just someone after a piece of the limelight. In this post, Rick outlines key attributes of a successful entrepreneur and whether or not you have what it takes to make it down this tough road.

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Waterloo’s Velocity accelerator is 5, and growing fast

By Francis Moran

student entrepreneurshipA little over five years ago, my attention was grabbed by an online news article that talked about a new incubation program being launched at the University of Waterloo for student-founded companies. Dubbed the “dormcubator,” a name that thankfully never really caught on, the program would see the university convert an existing student residence into an incubator for new companies, with company teams applying for residence and receiving a host of support and mentoring services.

I thought it was a brilliant idea and immediately reached out to then-program coordinator Sean Van Koughnett and offered whatever help I could from 550 kilometres away. My PR agency became an early sponsor of the program, and I travelled down to what was eventually called the Velocity residence a few times that next year to put on PR and marketing workshops and help mentor some of that first year’s teams. That level of involvement proved difficult to sustain over long distance but I never lost my enthusiasm for what Velocity was doing, and have kept a close eye on the program ever since as it has grown far beyond that original residence-based program.

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How to measure Facebook contest ROI

By Nick Steeves

You know how to measure the ROI of a PPC ad campaign: You can see the real revenue outcome from each ad and each click.

You’re not going to see direct sales from a Facebook contest, but it’s one of the most cost-effective ways to use social media to generate leads for your business. And by targeting your contest effectively, you’ll be able to make sure that every lead is actually interested in your business. I’ll explain how shortly.

In this article I’ll show you the different returns on investment to expect from running a Facebook contest and how to achieve them.

1.  Sales leads

The most powerful return on investment that a Facebook contest provides for a business is new leads. Every person who enters your Facebook contest gives you their email and contact details, making them a new lead to sell to. To maximize new emails and leads, you need to maximize entries. You can do this by making the barrier to entry as low as possible. Do this by asking only for name and email in order to enter. Minimizing your entry form to just one field will make it as fast and easy as possible to enter, maximizing your entry rate.

How do you make sure every lead is actually interested in your business?

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  • 5 Ways to Engage With Your Brand Voice - icuc.social : [...] “A strong company voice on social media should emphasize the company’s values, objectives and key differentiators that set it apart from its competitors. These can be expressed in the tone of the communication and the content that is shared with community members and the target audience.The best social media voices are communal, grammatical, dialectical, authentic, original, contextual, relevant, timely, persistent, responsive, helpful, generous and more informal. A company’s social media voice should only be changed if absolutely necessary and should maintain all of these qualities. Any change should be preceded by lots of information explaining the change to community members to ensure they know it is deliberate and that the company isn’t suffering from some form of instability, which jeopardizes relationships.” [@TechAlly, Francis Moran & Associates – via Francis Moran & Associates] [...]

  • Stephen Murray : Interesting article. I am close to finishing a book titled "Davis and Goliath - One Inventor's Struggle with the Mismanagement and Theft of Intellectual Property." Davis in my book is W.R. Davis Engineering. "Goliath" is the Canadian Department of National Defence. The intellectual property is an infrared signature suppression system to protect warships and tactical aircraft from being targetted by heat seeking missiles. I was a public servant co-inventor in this story. As was the case in the biblical story "David and Goliath," Davis did indeed slay Goliath. Davis is wealthy today. The inventors and the Crown got nothing. But the Crown's negligent acts were to blame for most of outcome. Everything that could have gone wrong in the story did go wrong. My book may interest you. Hope to have it published by year end.

  • Dan Rather’s Words of Wisdom for the PR profession | Return On Reputation : [...] that you are serving a higher purpose than just serving your clients – you are serving public interest and our nation’s [...]

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