Great articles roundup: Demo day, VCs, cost of content marketing and startup PR mistakes

Work with us

linkBy Hailley Griffis

In this week’s roundup we rail against misconception, with articles from PandoDaily, Venture Beat, Business to Community and Washington Business Journal. The authors are clearly fed up with people thinking demo days are a good idea, becoming a venture capitalist is easy, content marketing is free and doing public relations for startups is simple.

Let’s kill the demo day and replace it with a one-year reunion

Erin Griffith makes a good point in stating that a three-month program with a demo day at the end may not  be the best for startups or their investors. Rather, she proposes something closer to a reunion where startups are forced to provide value and truly demonstrate their periodic growth. This eliminates all of the hype that demo days create, as well as a few other things.

So you want to be a venture capitalist?

Have you always dreamed of becoming a venture capitalist? There are not many job openings, and competition is fierce. Eze Vidra explains the average venture capitalist is 46 years old and has a background as either an entrepreneur or has worked their way up. Although VCs get to be a part of the incredible startup world, they also have to say “no” 99 percent of the time. On a team, they are the coach rather than the player.

The true cost of effective content marketing

The statement “content marketing is free,” is much like saying “media relations is free advertising” (which our own Francis Moran addressed in an earlier post). Both statements are false. There are many costs that people do not take into account. Kevin Goldberg looks into some of the maintenance costs of content marketing.

5 PR mistakes that startups make

Startups are often under a lot of pressure, especially when the team is small. The early days of any company are very important though, and it is critical to make the right decisions when it comes to how consumers perceive the company. Enter public relations. Many startups want to jump right into public relations; Nina Dunn explains five mistakes they should watch out for, before they do.

Leave a comment:

Join us

Events We're Attending:

  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description