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Great articles roundup: PR agencies and Google, digital marketing misconceptions, startup failure, investor pitching

linkBy Hailley Griffis

In this week’s roundup, we explore how PR agencies are in fact not dead, and why digital marketing is more than just social media (and other misconceptions.) In addition, we focus on startups, with reads that look at the top ways startups screw up and a few red flags when pitching to investors. This week’s articles come from Spin Sucks, Fourth Source, Wamda and Forbes.

Don’t die PR agencies, what the recent Google changes really mean

Gini Dietrich replies with a resounding “no” to the idea that Google has just killed PR agencies, or news releases, with its new update. If you consider PR to be purely news releases then you need to get back to the media relations that were actually supposed to be happening, where you build a relationship with journalists and reporters, call them and then pitch an idea after that.

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When the rampaging elephant drops dead

When the rampaging elephant drops deadBy Francis Moran

When I started inmedia Public Relations in the late 1990s, Ottawa and much of the rest of North America was mid-way through one of the most inflated economic bubbles that had been experienced up to that point.

The 1996 Telecommunications Act in the U.S. had spawned scores of ILECs, CLECs and a host of other acronyms describing various flavours of telecommunications carriers, all of which were on hungry equipment-buying sprees. This coincided nicely with the rise of data versus voice traffic, and so the requirement to build out brand new kinds of packet- rather than circuit-switched networks. These twin market drivers were the impetus behind a raft of new optical, silicon and networking startups in Ottawa as well as the unprecedented climb of Nortel Networks, which at one point had a market capitalization worth more than one-third of the entire Toronto Stock Exchange.

Driving much of that data traffic — either actual or anticipated — was this thing called the Internet, which was in its first furious bloom. The notion had somehow taken hold of otherwise canny people that you could put up a web site to transact almost any sort of business and that massive value would swiftly be created simply by attracting eyeballs to that site, even if precious few of the owners of those eyeballs ever actually bought anything.

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How small businesses can prosper from B2B marketing

b2b

By Heather Campbell

Small businesses account for a huge chunk of business revenue produced in our country. In fact, there are nearly seven million small businesses in America. This includes everything from mom and pop shops in your local town to freelance work done in your neighbor’s basement. All of these businesses are important.

Completing a business to business transaction for a large corporation may be no big deal. These big businesses market their strengths easily. In many cases, they have a budget set aside for these things. They are experts at it. What about a small business though? Does it have the same success? Can it have the same success? Does it complete small business to big business marketing or small business to small business marketing?

The concept of business to business (B2B) marketing is very simple. B2B marketing is the relationship of selling and promoting between two businesses. Read More

Now that you’ve launched an app, time to work on v2.0

iPhoneAppStore_availableat_black_lowresBy Peter Hanschke

This is the last instalment of my journey product-managing myself to build and commercialize an iOS app.

In my previous post I revealed the name and details of my app and how important it is to test as many scenarios and on as many platforms as possible. I signed off the post with the fate of myFabWines resting in the hands of Apple’s review committee. Shortly after the post, I received word that myFabWines was accepted into the iTunes App Store. I had expected, based on all my previous research, that my app would be rejected the first time I submitted it. I honestly think my level of testing and setting up a beta program helped in being accepted on the first attempt. So, again, I can’t stress enough the importance of testing. On August 1, myFabWines was available for sale … mission accomplished. My target date was July 1, so I missed by a month, but I’m OK with that.

So now what? Version 2, of course!

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Great articles roundup: Demo day, VCs, cost of content marketing and startup PR mistakes

linkBy Hailley Griffis

In this week’s roundup we rail against misconception, with articles from PandoDaily, Venture Beat, Business to Community and Washington Business Journal. The authors are clearly fed up with people thinking demo days are a good idea, becoming a venture capitalist is easy, content marketing is free and doing public relations for startups is simple.

Let’s kill the demo day and replace it with a one-year reunion

Erin Griffith makes a good point in stating that a three-month program with a demo day at the end may not  be the best for startups or their investors. Rather, she proposes something closer to a reunion where startups are forced to provide value and truly demonstrate their periodic growth. This eliminates all of the hype that demo days create, as well as a few other things.

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