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December roundup: What does it take to bring technology to market?

By Daylin Mantyka december2013064

Even though we took our usual holiday break in December, we still covered a lot of ground on the blog throughout the month. Leading the pack was a well-received piece by our resident neuromarker, Bob Bailly, followed by a to-the-point post on improving your presentation skills in the new year.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

December 11: Would you kill the Fat Man?, by Bob Bailly

December 18: Five keys to your presentation success in 2014, by Anil Dilawri

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Great articles roundup: Social media, content marketing, marketing strategy and startups

By Daylin Mantyka link

It’s Friday and so time again for our weekly roundup. This one happens to be the last of 2013. Over the week, we’ve read great content from Social Media Explorer, Marketing Sherpa and Startup Professional Musings.

All I want for Christmas is…for the 80/20 rule to be abided by

All Tracey Parsons wants for Christmas is for marketers to be better marketers. More specifically, all she really wants is for the 80/20 rule to be followed and abided by. Sure, social media platforms can be a marketer’s dream, but there’s no reason to push your brand’s greatness over and over again. Be smart and provide value. That’s all Tracey asks for.

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Damn it, Beyoncé: Now all the pundits will say marketing is unnecessary

By Francis Moranbeyonce

It didn’t take long after music megastar Beyoncé dropped her latest release onto Apple iTunes with no advance warning or usual hype-fest for the armchair pundits and marketing deniers to trumpet that marketing was now dead. It’s a variation on a theme I excoriated a few weeks back where the same know-nothings tell young companies they don’t need to do marketing, they just need to go to SXSW.

In fairness to the NBC article linked above, it does go on to acknowledge that Beyoncé is a never-ending marketing machine who has spent the better part of 25 years building one of the most forceful brands in the entire global cultural marketplace. And in fairness to Kevin Roberts, the Saatchi & Saatchi CEO who was ever-so-briefly quoted in that article, his point was much less about what Beyoncé did and more about the new power consumers enjoy in the marketing equation that obliges brands to build relationships with consumers rather than just bark at them. ”She delivered intimacy. She delivered social connectivity. She delivered a transaction you can buy,” Roberts said in the original Bloomberg news piece from which the NBC article took a single provocative snippet.

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Great articles roundup: Social media, Gen Y, communications and entrepreneurship

By Daylin Mantyka link

It’s officially the end of the working week, which means that it’s time for our usual Friday roundup where we’ve compiled a short list of the top articles we read and loved. Grabbing our attention this week were posts from Global News, Duct Tape Marketing, Ingenium Communications and ventureburn.

Social media 2013 year in review: vigilante justice

In this informative piece,  recaps three cases of social media vigilante justice that happened in the last year: The hunt for the Boston Marathon bombers, Anonymous and justice for Rehtaeh, and the Roast Busters teen sex ring. Heather talks about both the harm and good that these social media rallies can cause and insists that coming together as a online community should be to make a positive difference.

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Crowdfunding is not marketing

By Francis Morancrowdfunding1

The first time I heard a company suggest that they were going to do a crowdfunding campaign not to raise money but to raise awareness, I thought it was one of the stupidest things I had heard in a long time. Since then I’ve heard it often enough to confirm that stupidity is one of the most contagious phenomena out there. And just because a lot of people think it’s a good idea doesn’t make it so.

Viewing crowdfunding as a substitute for marketing, or even as an effective marketing channel, ranks right up there with “We’ll do a viral video” in its betrayal of a complete lack of understanding of how marketing works.

Screen Shot 2013-12-04 at 12.51.57 PMNow, don’t get me wrong. Some crowdfunding campaigns have generated enormous attention for their sponsors. A Kickstarter campaign that broke all records was the Gangnam-calibre equivalent of a viral video for Waterloo entrepreneur Eric Migicovsky and his Pebble watch. (Although, as I recently tweeted, crowdfunding advocates — and people who think crowdfunding = marketing — really need to stop citing Pebble as an example. Nobody was more surprised than Migicovsky when his campaign, with its original target of just $100,000, ended up reeling in more than $10-million.) His fame has grown to the point that he is literally the poster child for wearable computers.

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