Technology Marketing 101

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When selling yourself as faster and cheaper is no longer enough: Part 2

This is the fifth article in a continuing series that will feature case studies and anecdotal stories from entrepreneurs, consultants and veteran marketers about their efforts to develop, implement and measure marketing programs to bring technology to market and grow market share. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

In Part 1, we introduced Host Analytics, an enterprise software vendor that delivers a suite of corporate performance management (CPM) tools through a software-as-a-service (SaaS) model. We discussed how the company initially positioned itself as a “faster and cheaper” alternative to established competitors such as Hyperion – a vendor later acquired by Oracle from which many of Host Analytics’ founders had come.

By the late 2000s, Host Analytics had come to realize that its initial value proposition no longer represented the firm’s true value and wasn’t supporting its position as an emerging market leader. It needed to rebrand and reposition itself and take advantage of the fact that SaaS had begun to go mainstream as a delivery model for many enterprise applications and had found greater acceptance among finance professionals.

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When selling yourself as faster and cheaper is no longer enough: Part 1

This is the fourth article in a continuing series that will feature case studies and anecdotal stories from entrepreneurs, consultants and veteran marketers about their efforts to develop, implement and measure marketing programs to bring technology to market and grow market share. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

In the past two months, Oracle has agreed to purchase RightNow Technologies for $1.4 billion, SAP has taken SuccessFactors for $3.4 billion, and IBM is buying DemandTec for $440 million.

What do all three of these deals have in common? An established enterprise technology vendor is buying a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) vendor to broaden its own product portfolio and bolster sagging sales.

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Driving steady organic growth on a shoestring

This is the third article in a continuing series that will feature case studies and anecdotal stories from entrepreneurs, consultants and veteran marketers about their efforts to develop, implement and measure marketing programs to bring technology to market and grow market share. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

Many startups with aspirations of grandeur have fallen prey to the temptation to call themselves a “leading provider of …”. But at Teamly, founder and CEO Scott Allison and his team appreciate that earning the label is a “big hairy audacious goal” which takes a lot of hard work and no shortage of hustling.

Teamly is a two-year-old startup which has brought to market an innovative productivity and project management tool which it delivers through a Software-as-a-Service (Saas) model. Or, as described in the company’s vision statement, “Teamly provides online teamwork software that helps businesses be more successful through more aligned and effective people.”

It’s a compelling value proposition at a time when the typical workplace is filled with more distractions than ever which erode productivity and throw the best laid plans out the window. But productivity tools are legion and many fail to live up to their hype.

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Part II: Dissecting the brain of the market pays off for BlueArc

This is the second article in a continuing series that will feature case studies and anecdotal stories from entrepreneurs, consultants and veteran marketers about their efforts to develop, implement and measure marketing programs to bring technology to market and grow market share. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

In last week’s post, we introduced BlueArc, a maker of networked attached storage (NAS) systems for managing unstructured data in high-performance computing applications, and Ken Rosen, a corporate strategy and marketing consultant who worked with the Blue Arc team in the mid-2000s.

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Part I: BlueArc’s challenge to get past the low-hanging fruit

This is the first article in a continuing series that will feature case studies and anecdotal stories from entrepreneurs, consultants and veteran marketers about their efforts to develop, implement and measure marketing programs to bring technology to market and grow market share. We invite your feedback.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

Last month, BlueArc Corp., a 13-year-old maker of network storage systems based in California, was acquired by Hitachi Data Systems for a reported $600 million.

BlueArc’s business was networked attached storage (NAS), the kind of high-end storage system for managing unstructured data — files, spreadsheets, digital content and images — in high-performance computing applications. However, the company struggled for years to achieve profitability despite periods of strong revenue growth.

“BlueArc, while it had received funding somewhere north of $200 million, couldn’t dominate the NAS market on its own. It needed a partner. With the acquisition by Hitachi and its intellectual property girth, it has nailed that market down,” InformationWeek’s Deni Connor wrote shortly after the deal was announced.

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