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What’s in a name?

By Leo Valiquettehello-my-name-is1

A company name that is a mashup of the founders’ initials. A company name drawn from the item the first business plan was sketched upon, or where the founder was enjoying a cocktail when they struck upon the idea. Even names arbitrarily plucked out of thin air without any intention of there being any kind of profound or clever meaning.

I’ve seen it all with over 13 years as a business journalist and marketing and PR consultant. A company’s name is not the company’s brand, but the two do enjoy a symbiotic relationship. A name is a point of reference, an introduction, which may or may not make a direct reference to what the company does.

But a name alone does not sell products, win customers or grow market share. These things are accomplished through the hustle of the team members, how they treat their customers, how they research the market to understand to whom, and in what form, their product or service delivers value, and how they execute on that intelligence.

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Great articles roundup: Misfit and millennial entrepreneurs, marketing teams and content marketing

By Daylin Mantyka link

It’s Friday — which means that it’s time for the great articles weekly roundup. This week. we selected worthy content from Fast Company, Under 30 CEO and Marketing Tech Blog.

First, an article that dives into the definition and value of a misfit entrepreneur, followed by a post on how to  achieve success through innovation. Next, we selected a slideshow that outlines how to create the optimal marketing organization. Closing the roundup for this week is some real-world advice on developing a unique content marketing strategy in a dev shop.

A brief manifesto for misfit entrepreneurs

Sunmin Kim defines a misfit entrepreneur as a person who has shifted from her or his formal training, such as engineering, to explore other industries by means of developing a business. In this post, Sunmin explores whether or not career pivots offer an edge on the competition or act as a hindrance to progress.

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‘They didn’t do any marketing. They just went to SXSW’

By Francis MoranBell Curve

I’d be a semi-rich man if I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard someone point to one of the spectacularly successful companies that have exploded onto the marketplace over the last few years and say, “They didn’t do any marketing. They just …” and then fill in the blank with some seemingly trivial thing, like “They just went to South by Southwest,” or “They just did social media.”

I heard it again just last week when I guest lectured to a University of Ottawa MBA class, with Twitter and Facebook held up as the examples of companies that “didn’t do any marketing.” As I told the students, Twitter and Facebook are no more examples of predictable startup success than buying a lottery ticket is an example of sensible retirement planning. I drew a bell curve in the air and said that if that bell curve described the distribution of success for a given collection of technology startups, then Twitter and Facebook — and here I moved several meters to the right and stretched my right arm out — are way over here. They’re not even outliers; they’re in a completely different orbit.

And still the mythology persists. I can understand it. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat are all wildly successful companies, and who wouldn’t want to emulate them. The truth is, though, that most who do, fail. We hear about the (very) odd one that succeeds but, by definition, we hear nothing about the failures, of which there are countless.

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October roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

By Daylin MantykaCalendar-October-2013-Excel

Last month’s contents were newsworthy and informative. Leading the pack was Maurice Smith’s post on the ultimate marketing challenge followed by Leo Valiquette’s piece on phone etiquette. As always, we had some great contributions from our guest bloggers on presentation skills, measuring Facebook contest ROI, the neurobiology of marketing, and filing patent applications, among others.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

October 9: The ultimate marketing challenge: Final Fling helps plan your own death, by Maurice Smith

October 29: Don’t let your phone skills atrophy, by Leo Valiquette

October 23: When a good presentation isn’t good enough, by Anil Dilawri

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Great articles roundup: Content briefs, entrepreneurship, behavioural economics and social media

By Daylin Mantyka link

It’s Friday — which means that it’s time for the weekly roundup. This week. we have informative content from velocity, Founder Dating, memeburn, The Buzz Bin and Duct Tape Marketing.

7 critical elements of a great content brief 

Doug Kessler says that home-run content doesn’t happen by accident and that it always starts with a great plan. Since marketers aren’t often the ones producing the content, it’s incredibly important to communicate clearly in content briefs. Besides the usual stuff nascent to all, Doug goes a step further and identifies seven elements to turn good into great.

Am I an entrepreneur?

A serial entrepreneur based out of Silicon Valley, Rick Marini hears from many young startup enthusiasts and how they want to build a multibillion-dollar company. But before jumping in, he urges you to consider whether or not you actually are an entrepreneur or just someone after a piece of the limelight. In this post, Rick outlines key attributes of a successful entrepreneur and whether or not you have what it takes to make it down this tough road.

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