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Great articles roundup: Social media, content marketing, marketing strategy and startups

By Daylin Mantyka link

It’s Friday and so time again for our weekly roundup. This one happens to be the last of 2013. Over the week, we’ve read great content from Social Media Explorer, Marketing Sherpa and Startup Professional Musings.

All I want for Christmas is…for the 80/20 rule to be abided by

All Tracey Parsons wants for Christmas is for marketers to be better marketers. More specifically, all she really wants is for the 80/20 rule to be followed and abided by. Sure, social media platforms can be a marketer’s dream, but there’s no reason to push your brand’s greatness over and over again. Be smart and provide value. That’s all Tracey asks for.

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Crowdfunding is not marketing

By Francis Morancrowdfunding1

The first time I heard a company suggest that they were going to do a crowdfunding campaign not to raise money but to raise awareness, I thought it was one of the stupidest things I had heard in a long time. Since then I’ve heard it often enough to confirm that stupidity is one of the most contagious phenomena out there. And just because a lot of people think it’s a good idea doesn’t make it so.

Viewing crowdfunding as a substitute for marketing, or even as an effective marketing channel, ranks right up there with “We’ll do a viral video” in its betrayal of a complete lack of understanding of how marketing works.

Screen Shot 2013-12-04 at 12.51.57 PMNow, don’t get me wrong. Some crowdfunding campaigns have generated enormous attention for their sponsors. A Kickstarter campaign that broke all records was the Gangnam-calibre equivalent of a viral video for Waterloo entrepreneur Eric Migicovsky and his Pebble watch. (Although, as I recently tweeted, crowdfunding advocates — and people who think crowdfunding = marketing — really need to stop citing Pebble as an example. Nobody was more surprised than Migicovsky when his campaign, with its original target of just $100,000, ended up reeling in more than $10-million.) His fame has grown to the point that he is literally the poster child for wearable computers.

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November roundup: What does it take to bring technology to market?

By Daylin Mantyka 2013-calendar-november

Last month’s contents were newsworthy and informative. Leading the pack was Francis Moran’s post on angel investors and crowdfunding, followed by Maurice Smith’s post on the definition of “Digital Media.”  As always, we had some great contributions from our guest bloggers on presentation skills, leadership, government policy makers and entrepreneurs, among others.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

November 14: Angel investors can’t sit on crowdfunding sidelines, by Francis Moran

November 13: ‘Digital media’ evades easy definition, and so proper measurement, by Maurice Smith

November 11: Join Startup Canada for an entrepreneurial invasion of Parliament Hill, by Francis Moran

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Great articles roundup: Content strategists, equity, content distribution, social media and startups

By Daylin Mantyka link

Friday is the day for our weekly content roundup. This week, we’ve read and shared a number of interesting pieces published in Fast Company, Techvibes, Forrester Research, SmartBlogs and Forbes.

First, we’ve got an article on content strategists, followed by a post on granting equity in a startup. Next, we’ve selected a piece on the rise of a new discipline, content distribution. Rounding out our selection is an article on monitoring your social media campaigns and a piece on how to get your new business off the ground.

Five must-know things about content strategists

Rusty Weston, a seasoned content strategist himself, knows the ins and outs of this evolving industry. In this thoughtful post, he shares his wisdom to current and future content strategists on how they can best serve the businesses they work with.

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Angel investors can’t sit on crowdfunding sidelines

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 11.43.11 AMBy Francis Moran

The biggest mistake Canadian angel investors could make if and when equity crowdfunding is made more widely available in Canada “is to sit on the sidelines and do nothing and let crowdfunding pass them by,” says one of this country’s leading legal experts on the subject.

Lawyer Brian Koscak, who will be part of a crowdfunding panel discussion at next week’s National Angel Capital Organization national summit in Banff, said in an interview that the potential broadening of equity crowdfunding in parts of Canada “is a wonderful opportunity for angels to step up and show what they’ve got.” Angels, he said, have a wealth of expertise both in the specific sectors in which they invest and in the investment process itself, making them invaluable participants in any crowdfunding portals that are established.

Angel investors are often the first external source of funding that startups and young companies receive. (A survey of 20 out of NACO’s 24 angel group members reported that angels made 139 investments worth $40.5-million in 2012.) In Canada, as in most other countries, angels must have a minimum income or net worth before being allowed to invest, criteria that shuts out most investors. Securities regulators in Ontario and Saskatchewan have proposed expanding the opportunity for early-stage private investment by allowing companies to solicit small investments from larger pools of individual investors. Even if these proposals never become law, ordinary investors can already, under certain circumstances, participate in early-stage investing everywhere in Canada except Ontario.

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