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June roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

june-2013-calendar-events+++

By Hailley Griffis

Last month’s content lineup featured great posts that shattered common myths about listening to feedback from investors, the future of the tech-world for entrepreneurs and how far a little cleverness can take you in your marketing strategy. We also looked at the International Startup Festival being held in Montreal this month for the third year in a row and the astounding importance that neurons play in our day-to-day lives.

In case you missed any of it, here is a handy recap of our posts, as ranked by the enthusiasm of our readers:

June 18 : The art of ignoring feedback, by Anil Dilawri

June 04: Where do the next opportunities lie for savvy tech entrepreneurs?, by Denzil Doyle

June 26:  International Startup Festival hits Montreal for third edition, by Francis Moran

June 17:  A little cleverness goes a long, long way, by Leo Valiquette

June 19: You are what you think, by Bob Bailly

June 12: Why my pony tail ain’t my brand, by Francis Moran

June 06: House renos and the art of customer service, by Francis Moran

June 05: Your local newspaper may be your hardest to crack, and least relevant, media outlet, by Leo Valiquette

June 24: Why confidentiality, by David French

June 27: Running faster is not the solution to Canada’s productivity challenge, by Denzil Doyle

June 10: 4 reasons why you need a mobile website, by Debra Kaye

June 11: With clients, you must sometimes be cruel to be kind, by Leo Valiquette

June 20: Are developers responsible for how their products are used?, by Francis Moran

June 25: Summer is no time to slack off, by Leo Valiquette

June 13: Customer surveys are great. Unless you ask the wrong questions, by Francis Moran

Image: June 2013 Calendar Printable 

House renos and the art of customer service

By Francis Moran

Regular readers of this blog will know that we have something of an obsession with customer service. At first glance, it might not seem obvious why a technology market blog might be so preoccupied with this. Except, as I have written many times, customer service is based on what I have come to call my first law of competitive differentiation, the proposition that, in an age when almost any technological or cost advantage will rapidly and inevitably be eroded, the only sustainable competitive differentiation for most companies is to treat their customers like the centre of the universe, which they are.

Based on recent experience, I have to say there’s nothing quite like doing a major round of house renovations to expose the good, the bad and the carpet layers of customer service.

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May Roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

Thank you for being with us for the fourth month of our new blog. Although a bit late, here is a recap of our posts from May in case you missed them, beginning with, in chronological order, the latest installments in our ongoing series on getting technology to market, The Commercialization Ecosystem, which covered a great swath of topics including government and education’s role in the startup ecosystem, cultures of risk, intellectual property, sustainable viable products and other pearls of wisdom.

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Where’s your next VP of sales or marketing coming from?

By Francis Moran

It has been a common lament of technology companies in Canada that this country lacks high-quality sales and marketing talent, driving CEOs to source their c-level executives from south of the border. The most common refrain is that they are looking for someone who has “been there, done that,” and such folks are simply not lying thick on the ground in these parts.

I’m pretty sure I don’t buy into the underlying proposition but let’s assume for the moment that it has merit. I certainly wouldn’t argue that you would want to de-risk your go-to-market and sales strategies by hiring folks who can demonstrate they have the ability to build and drive world-class sales and marketing organizations playing in your target market. While I do think such folks can be found up here in the frozen north, the bigger criticism I have with CEOs who go head-hunting for talent down south is that they perpetuate a chicken-and-egg situation that ultimately plays against them.

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April Roundup: What does it take to get technology to market?

Thank you for being with us for the third month of our new blog. Although a bit late, here is a recap of our posts from April in case you missed them, beginning with, in chronological order, the latest installments in our ongoing series on getting technology to market, The Commercialization Ecosystem, which covered a great swath of topics including lean startups, cultures of risk, the right stuff entrepreneurs need to succeed and other pearls of wisdom.

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