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Is your founder a Rob Ford?

By Jeff Campbell leadership-370x229

The behaviours and acts of Rob Ford that are being amplified by media outlets around the world are comical at times, misguided for certain, illegal and problematic. But are they really problematic in terms of the job he is to perform or simply so opposite to the behaviours we expect of a leader that we immediately deem them problematic? Don’t get me wrong — Rob Ford is definitely behaving inappropriately. If, as Ford maintains, he continues to perform his job and is producing better results than his peers and predecessors, should we attempt to distance the personal behaviours from his role and track record as a leader?

What I wish to focus on here is not the sordid and incomprehensible behaviours of the mayor of a truly world-class, and Canada’s largest city, Toronto. Rather, I wish to shine the light on start-up leaders who behave badly.

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You can’t rely on the channel to grow sales in new markets

By Jeff Campbell

I had an interesting call with a long time colleague and friend today. He is a well known and respected leader in his field. His expertise and notoriety has been developed over years of innovating and perfecting processes that are measurable, repeatable and produce consistently high-quality results. This guy is and has to be a great salesperson in order to sell his ideas and grow his business. Currently he is managing a software business, developing and offering software that provides automation and process management in his area of discipline.

He explained that, while his company has marquee customers internationally, the majority of its business is confined to one region. Expansion to new territories is critical, he explained, for strategic reasons; expanding global implementations will mitigate risk of competition coming into the region from elsewhere and increase value for stakeholders.

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Is the ‘last mile’ of sales automation keeping your reps from closing more business?

By Jeff Campbell

A recent CSO Insights survey found that B2B sales people spend an average of 57 per cent of their time on things other than selling.

In my 33 years in the technology business doing sales, managing sales teams and building software businesses it has always felt like something was missing in the way we automated sales and this egregious productivity measurement supports this feeling. Now I can finally articulate what it is that’s missing. It’s the “last mile” of sales automation.

Let me explain.

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Mind the gap between marketing and sales: Part 2

By Jeff Campbell

Gap? What gap?

In a previous post (Mind the gap) I described the gap that exists between marketing and sales. You know, the one where marketing measures campaigns by direct engagement with materials and by customer actions on the web whereas sales measures activity of salespeople and the state of opportunities. Because these are two different units of measurement along the continuum from awareness to closed sale, it is difficult to accurately gauge a return on the marketing investment and to forecast.

You may also recall how this makes the sales manager’s job a critical one in terms of translating the sales measures into a reliable forecast. The marketing manager, meanwhile, must reconcile marketing measures in the context of forecast and revenue to demonstrate a return on the marketing investment. In other words, “mind the gap.”

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Mind the gap between marketing and sales

By Jeff Campbell

This is a familiar phrase to all those who have used the tube to get around London. It may also be familiar to those who continue to try to reconcile the information we often use to measure marketing effectiveness with sales forecast. In other words, trying to answer the question, “How will my marketing spend translate into revenue?”

Along the continuum from awareness to closed sale, marketers and sales leaders use many measurements to manage the processes and understand the effectiveness of various investments. The thing is, marketing uses metrics like impressions, click-through rate and conversions (among many others) to understand the effectiveness of campaigns while in sales, measurements are typically activity-based or state-based. Some examples include: number of leads, number of calls, number of opportunities by stage, and so on. All of the sales measurements are provided through the sales people themselves while the marketing measurements are taken directly from prospects’ actions.

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