We Bring Technology to Market.

Work with us

Best of: I’m sick and tired of hearing that Canadians don’t take risks

This is the next entry in our “Best of” series, in which we venture deep into the vault to replay blog opinion and insight that has withstood the test of time. Today’s post hails from December 2011. We welcome your feedback. 

By Francis MoranCubes - 207 - BEST OF

More than two decades ago, I was working with a public relations agency in Halifax, Nova Scotia, that was helping a resource development company counter considerable opposition within fishing communities to its proposal to drill exploratory natural gas wells on Georges Bank. It was a classic case of a clash between a critically important but fading industry — the fishery — and a new and incredibly promising industry — offshore hydrocarbon extraction. We mounted an open and consultative information campaign in the fishing communities most dependent on Georges Bank. We held countless meetings in and around those communities. We hired a local lad, the son of a fishing family, who had become a geologist and had worked in oil and gas exploration to head up our community efforts. And we organised a critical political gathering — a dinner in Halifax to which we invited scores of influential business, political and community leaders to hear directly from the company CEO.

I wasn’t at the dinner but my colleagues told me what happened and I am paraphrasing in the quotes below.

The CEO, almost a caricature of the good old boy cigar-chomping American oilman, got to his feet after desert and, as part of his prepared comments, told the assembled dignitaries, “The problem with you’all is you don’t know how to take risk.”

Read More

Posted in:

Best of: Culture of risk: Are you willing to bet the farm?

This is the next entry in our “Best of” series, in which we venture deep into the vault to replay blog opinion and insight that has withstood the test of time. Today’s post hails from April 2011. We welcome your feedback. 

By Francis Moran and Leo ValiquetteCubes - 207 - BEST OF

In our various interviews for this series, one of the most elusive topics of discussion has been culture of risk. Elusive in that it strays into the realm of stereotype and generalization.

Can it be defined by borders, or is that a naive misconception? Is it somehow encoded in the DNA of one nation’s culture more than another, shaped and influenced by how much public policy favours free-market capitalism versus socialism, or all of the above?

There is no one simple answer. However, few would argue that U.S. entrepreneurs tend to have more of a balls-to-the-wall, bet-the-farm-on-a-brilliant-idea mindset than their Canadian counterparts, while U.K. entrepreneurs fall somewhere in the middle … most of the time. On the other hand, one could also argue that entrepreneurs in Western Canada tend to be more “American” in their mindset versus their peers further east, while the characteristics that best define Silicon Valley can’t be found anywhere else in the U.S. And then there are those Israelis, who have cast a mould all their own.

Read More

How may my technology help you?

This is the next entry in our “Best of” series, in which we venture deep into the vault to replay blog opinion and insight that has withstood the test of time. Today’s post hails from November 2007. We welcome your feedback.

Fotolia_27389812_XS-300x200By Francis Moran

Canada’s national broadcaster, the CBC, is airing a special series on its national radio news programs called, “How may I help you?” I caught the first in-depth piece yesterday evening and I so badly wanted to call in and share my endless stack of customer service horror stories. Many fellow listeners obviously felt the same way; as of late this morning, fully 279 (!) individual stories of lament had been posted to CBC’s web site.

The issue put me in mind of an article, authored by Graham Technology’s Frank Kirwan, that we secured in Customer Management magazine earlier this year.

As I was listening to the radio piece last evening and reading some of the horror stories posted online this morning, the key point that kept coming back to me from Kirwan’s article was “Dissatisfaction is a greater driver of (customer) defection than satisfaction is of retention.” And judging from the number of CBC listeners who wrote that they would never again do business with that bank, telephone company, travel agency or whatever, clearly it takes just a single outrageous example of lousy customer service to trigger that defection.

It really doesn’t have to be that way.
Read More

Taking the lean approach to market

This is the next entry in our “Best of” series, in which we venture deep into the vault to replay blog opinion and insight that has withstood the test of time. Today’s post hails from April 2011. We welcome your feedback.

Fotolia_27389812_XS-300x200By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

It’s fitting that we follow up last week’s post on the strategic value of marketing in its purest sense as a process for enabling customer validation and iterative product development with a definition of this thing called lean startup.

Strategic marketing is a fundamental aspect of the lean startup methodology, a methodology first defined by Eric Ries almost three years ago. And lean startup itself as a process for bringing technology to market warrants careful consideration by any entrepreneur in the socially enabled age of Web 2.0.

It’s fitting because just this month, Ries updated his definition of lean startup based on how the concept has evolved since it was first coined.

Ries defines lean “in the sense of low burn. Of course, many startups are capital efficient and generally frugal. But by taking advantage of open source, agile software, and iterative development, lean startups can operate with much less waste.”

Read More

Training your new boss

This is the next article in a continuing series chronicling the growth path of NanoScale Corporation, a growing nanotechnology company based in Manhattan, KS that is commercializing various advanced materials and compounds for improving indoor air quality, removing pollutants, and containing and neutralizing hazardous chemicals.

By Francis Moran and Leo Valiquette

When last we spoke with Vice-President and General Manager Kyle Knappenberger, NanoScale Corporation was gearing up to make the most of a busy event season that included important showings at industry tradeshows as well as its own training and education events to support retail distributors. NanoScale’s senior team, however, has found itself somewhat distracted by the process of onboarding an important hire – a new president and CEO.

“Some of the things you’d like to do from a marketing standpoint … some of those activities have to get put on hold,” Knappenberger said, adding that a new executive will also have his own input to offer, which could put a new perspective on what the company is trying to do and how it is attempting to execute from a sales and marketing standpoint.

Read More

Page 1 of 13123...10...Last »

Join us

Events We're Attending:

  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description
  • image description